Cat Spay and Neuter: A Pet Parent’s Guide

cat spay and neuter

Cat spay and neuter is the surgical procedure of removing your cat’s reproductive organs. Specifically, spaying is for removing a female cat’s ovaries (and often uterus), and castration or neutering is the removal of a male cat’s testicles.

Are you thinking about whether your cat needs spay or neuter surgery? Read further and learn more about this practice.

Cat Spay and Neuter Benefits

You’d be surprised by how much you and your cat can benefit from spaying or neutering them. The benefits can be behavioral, health-related, and overall preventive.

Improved Behavior

  • Less likelihood for male cats spraying their urine on vertical surfaces to mark their territory. Also male urine will be much less smelly!
  • Reduction in roaming behavior for mate-seeking
  • Potential reduction in fighting with other cats

Improved Health

  • Reduces risks of phantom pregnancies, mammary tumors & womb infections in female cats
  • Prevent testicular cancers in male cats
  • Potential reduction in fight wounds

Limits Inconveniences

  • No unnecessary vet bills on unplanned pregnancies and raising kittens
  • Prevents bloody discharge and screaming in female cats during season
  • Indicating on their ID tag that they are neutered makes for a good deterrent against cat theft

While costly, this is a one-time expense that can save you a lot of money on other medical bills, as already mentioned. The price to spay or neuter a cat depends on the cat’s size, weight, and sex. In the Netherlands, castrating a male cat costs around €96, whereas spaying a female cat can be around €200.

Is it Bad to Neuter a Cat?

There are a few reasons to not spay or neuter your cat. Some pet parents wish to show or breed their pets; others are faced with financial constraints or fear of anesthesia. Other than in specific situations however, the pros of spaying or neutering your cat outweigh the cons.

Did you know? Neutering levels dropped significantly during the pandemic. As a result, cat charities urge owners to neuter their cats as an estimated one million cats are still unneutered in the UK.

Ideally, it is best to consult an online vet who can give you advice that applies specifically to your cat rather than looking up reasons that apply more generally to pet parents and pets.

What Age to Neuter a Cat?

You should talk to your vet and determine the best time to spay or neuter your cat. Usually, the ideal time is around the age when your cat reaches sexual maturity (6-9 months).

Cat Spay or Neuter Recovery

Cat spay or neuter recovery only lasts for a few days (roughly 7-10 days). After the surgery, your cat will usually go home the same day. They will have received pain medication prior to and during surgery, and they may go home with pain relief as well. In addition to this, your cat might be wearing a protective collar to prevent licking the incision while it heals. Finally, your vet may have you return for a follow-up visit to examine the healing process and remove any stitches if present.

Final Words

There are many benefits to spaying or neutering a cat for you and your feral baby, and they are difficult to ignore. Talk to your vet if you still don’t know whether you should move forward with cat spay and neuter.

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