German Rottweiler Dog Breed

german rottweiler dog

Are you looking for an intelligent guard dog with affectionate qualities? Consider adopting a Rottweiler. There is a lot more to this German-bred dog than dominance and aggression. Are you curious to learn whether they are a good option for you and your family? Then, read further and find out.

German Rottweiler Dog Breed Basics

  • Size: Large
  • Weight: 35-60kg
  • Life expectancy: 8-10 years
  • Classification: Working
  • Good with other dogs: yes with training
  • Good with kids: yes with training
  • Good with cats: yes

History & Origin

The Rottweiler dog breed is believed to be one of the oldest known dog breeds, with its origin dating back to the Roman age. They are possibly descendants of cattle-driving dogs from the Roman legions left in Rottweil, Germany, during the 2nd century after they abandoned the region. Since the Middle Ages and until the 20th century, the working breed would help local butchers carry money to the market in a neck pouch. The Rottweiler would also provide other services such as:

  • police dog
  • guard dog
  • rescue dog
  • draft dog (pulling a cart)
  • drove dog (cattle-driving)

Appearance

The Rottweiler dog is a large-sized breed with thick bones, a blocky head, and a broad body. The breed is always black with mahogany or rust markings. These markings are usually over the eyes, cheeks, muzzle, chest and legs.

Behavior

Rottweilers are inextricably protective, loyal, and obedient dogs due to their guarding and protection work history. However, extensive training is most important to develop, maintain, and strengthen such qualities with people and other pets. They are a confident, active and intelligent breed that need guidance from the start.

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Rottweilers are also affectionate dogs who constantly seek to make physical contact (i.e. licking) when expressing their love and affection. Thus, it may not be as strange to think of them snuggling with a house cat or seeing the two of them grooming each other.

Training

Extensive socialization and acclamation from early puppyhood are most crucial. They are the key factors that determine how much a Rottweiler can get along with cats, other dogs, kids, and the family in general. In addition, exercise is crucial to their health as they are a breed prone to obesity.

Be sure to add enough training and socialization to their routine to encourage them to develop and improve their co-species friendships with house cats. They are considerably large dogs with a prey drive that makes them want to chase after cats. Training enables them to control their prey drive as well as aggression. Moreover, due to their typically brave and bold personality, Rottweilers can sometimes be stubborn and refuse to back down from a pet fight.

Frequently Asked Questions

What types of Rottweiler dogs are there?

There are three types of Rottweiler dog breeds:

  • German Rottweiler
  • American Rottweiler
  • Roman Rottweiler

They all share similar features and qualities with some key distinctions. For example, the American Rottweiler is intelligent and calm but not aggressive like the German. Moreover, the Roman Rottweiler is known to be the giant Rottweiler for its large or oversized height, and in many cases, they are a mix-breed dog of a Rottweiler and an English Mastiff.

Is a Rottweiler a good family dog?

A Rottweiler can be an excellent choice for a family dog due to their affection, loyalty, and protective instinct. They make excellent family members as long as you train them properly and consistently from a young age.

Are Rottweilers safe around small dogs?

Rottweilers can get along with other animals, including smaller dogs, but just as with cats, smaller dogs may trigger their prey drive. Rottweilers, however, do tend to work well with other dogs as long as they socialize. In addition, to reduce the chance of further territorial behavior, consider getting all the dogs neutered.

Now you’re up to date on the German Rottweiler dog breed! Still got questions? Then book a video consultation with one of our qualified veterinarians to get advice on your pet questions within minutes.

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