Cat Age Calculator

If your cat was a human, how old would she be? Ever wonder how old your cat is in human years? Use our calculator to find out!

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How Does the Cat Age Calculator Work?

Cats develop rapidly in their first two years of their lives. By their second year, they’re already in their mid-20’s in human years. Thus, the old “seven year” rule is not at all accurate.

According to Dr. Marty Becker, founder of Fear Free Pets, cat age is calculated based on the following data:

  • The first year of a cat is equal to 15 human years.
  • The second year of a cat is equal to 25 human years.
  • After that, each year is equal to four human years.

Why is Knowing a Cat’s Age Important?

Using the calculator to estimate your cat’s age in human years is a fun way of learning more about your feline friend. However, understanding how old your cat is and how they age can also help you know how to better care for them and when it is the right time to do it.

For example, if you are a pet parent to a 10-year old cat, you will know that they are adults but not seniors yet. Thus, you will know when it is the right time to monitor better their behavior, activity levels, and eating habits.

Don’t Know your Cat’s Age?

You may have found and adopted a stray cat. In this case, you don’t know their exact age. However, you can estimate it. Find below some general points to characteristics that can pinpoint an estimate for your cat’s age. If you are still not sure, your best bet is consulting a vet.

  • Check their teeth: The older the cat, the more stained their teeth are. White teeth are common in cats younger than 1 year. Yellow teeth are common for 1-2 year olds. Meanwhile, tarter build-up usually occurs in 3-5 year old cats. Note that tartar can depend on various factors such as their diet and whether they previously had dental care. Lastly, missing teeth commonly indicate that the cat is a senior. However, there may be exceptions such as previous dental surgeries that resulted to loss of teeth.
  • Check their coat: Coat thickness differs among breeds, and some cats may have a natural, fine or thick fur at any age. Oftentimes, senior cats have thicker and coarser fur. Moreover, older cats will usually have patches of white or gray.
  • Check their muscle tone: If your cat is muscular, it’s probably young. Older cats tend to be bonier with extra skin. The more they age, the more their shoulder bones protrude.
  • Check their eyes: Depending on health and breed, young cats tend to have bright and clear eyes. One indication of aging is jagged eyes and eye cloudiness.

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